Next Step

Next Step for the Escallonia was carried out today. I applied the wood hardener to the inside of the trunk with a trusty tooth brush. This was followed up by a fresh coat of lime sulphur.

An hour or so later.

Lime sulphur was applied at 3:1 ratio. It’s very white for now but will fade over the Winter and will hopefully be the right colour come flowering next year. It’s now going into some winter protection.

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Escallonia Step by Step

I did a little more work on the Escallonia in November.

Peter Warren had suggested back in October that I remove a front branch. I did this and now this stump needed added to the deadwood on the tree.

When Mr Snart was here a few weeks back we had a look at it. Peter has excellent carving skills and I wanted his advice about opening up the trunk to allow me to reach the hollow centre. It had rotted at the base and was hollow inside, but I couldn’t reach this area to add wood hardener. Peter kindly offered to do a little carving on the tree to add the extra deadwood at the front and also open up the trunk to allow me to gain access.

This was the tree before removal of the front branch.

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and after branch removal

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Here is Peter doing a little carving.

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On Friday I spent a little time washing out the remains of the sawdust and rotted wood. I did a little more carving and cleaning of the original deadwood to remove some algae. As you can see below there are now 3 opening added by Peter into the centre of the trunk that I can now access and apply hardener. The opening are small visually but allow room for a toothbrush to enter. The remaining heartwood is all solid and rotting seemed to have been limited.

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I plan to treat the wood this week and apply a fresh coat of lime sulphur to the outside, perhaps darkened down a tad. I’ll keep you posted.

Yearly Task

This recovering Japanese Maple has a big area of deadwood at the base extending up the trunk. It was extremely rotten when I got it and it requires a lot of attention with wood hardener to keep it as is. I added another coat of hardener a few days ago.

 

Storm Damage

On my walk this morning it was obvious that the high winds from a few weeks ago had taken their toll on this particular trail.

An old Hawthorn stump exhibiting some nice deadwood.

The trail ahead.

Uro Inspiration

On my walk yesterday I saw quite a lot of deadwood on deciduous trees. Here are some examples.

This was a large Linden Raft with rotting ground hugging branches.

Oak.

Beech

What’s this one?

It’s a Japanese Maple Bonsai 🙂

Taken for Granted…

This Cotoneaster was one of my first trees. Previous Post

As stated previously, I’m not happy with the look of this tree. I have been over looking it on purpose for a while but yesterday I tweaked it a little to try and hide a few faults.

This was it yesterday morning.

Three faults that I tried to tackle where:

1. This long straight branch showing under the main pad of foliage.

2. This ugly curving branch.

3. These 2 visible branches that catch the eye.

I was able to hide number 1 by adjusting the foliage of the pad with wire dropping it to break the line of the branch. Straight lines in an image catch the eye.

Again, number 2 was concealed by dropping the foliage from another branch down in front of it. Further growth will be needed to complete this.

Fault 3 was solved by a little wiring in the apex to move the foliage to create a nicer apex but also stop the eye being drawn ring through the image to the straight back branch.

I then decided to play about with the position of the primary branch by using a guy line to pull it backwards.This is hard to see in a 2D image. I may decide to change this again.

It is amazing how different a tree looks in a photo. Some new growth will be needed to complete what I started.

As this is one of the first trees I ever carved, I should really pay more attention to how it looks. The longer a tree sits on your bench, the more you take it for granted. It’s hard to always look at a tree with fresh eyes. A lesson I’m trying to learn.