Swindon bonsai show 2014

A great blog post from Andy from the Swindon Show looking mostly at Shohin trees. Getting me in the mood for Willowbog 🙂

Andys shohin bonsai

The swindon show has become over the years a real must view bonsai show on the UK bonsai calendar, and while the lighting this year had been replaced in the main hall for crisp white light giving superb conditions. The trees where of a superb quality, while all sizes where on show I was drawn to the shohin trees.

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Very nice cork bark elm without as many have the inverse taper.

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Another but this one has that classic inverse, but has good ramification.

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Hornbeam size wise this is just outside shohin.

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This one was interesting, while a nice idea I feel for me it was too large for the pagoda as the framework broke lines of the tree.

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This chojubai is a favourite for me for shohin bonsai.

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Here are a few of the accents that caught my eye.

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Nothing quite says spring like snow drops.

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This is a rare…

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A step in the right direction.

Getting excited 🙂

A visit to Shunka-en

brendenstudio

The second stop on our garden tour was to Kunio Kobayashi’s bonsai garden, Shunka-en. Located just outside Tokyo (and a fair drive from Kimura’s garden) it was begun by his father some seventy years ago. The garden was the largest I’d seen that day and very impressive. We were greeted by trees before we ever set foot in the garden–they were even on the roof!

Roof garden

Once inside the gate, we were ushered past familiar, famous old junipers and pines to the indoor Tokonoma display area by our guide, whose name I forgot, but has been an apprentice there for two years now and speaks excellent English.

Our guide

The first display featured an Ume, or Japanese flowering plum, one of the first trees to flower in early spring:

Ume

The next display featured a Japanese black pine with a cascading branch and the elements of display suggesting water as the black pine grows…

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Coal Tit Visitor

This little Coal Tit has become a regular visitor to my Living Room window where he is keen to find insects on the window frame. He announces himself with a tap tap with his beak 🙂 He perches on trees outside before launching himself toward the glass.

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